Education and Training
Diversity and Inclusion

Golf Women Mean Business

Editor's Note: (Back row) Stephen Hamlin, PGA, Sandy Cross, Hermon Mason, Amanda James. Cathy Martin. (Front row) Linnet Carty, Nancy Lewis, Oneda Castillo, LPGA, LaJean Gould, Mary Grover, Bentina Terry, Patrina King, Lauren Shelly.

 

In keeping with our commitment to diversity and inclusion, the PGA of America is on the forefront of growing the game of golf for women and girls, and closing the gender gap. As more  women and girls are playing and involved in the business of golf we have made it a priority to engage and support diverse groups around the country that are growing the game in their communities.

The PGA of America was the presenting sponsor for the Golf Diversity Roundtable, spearheaded by the Golf Women Mean Business headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. The PGA of America is  striving for golf and its workforce to better reflect the demographic composition of the United States.

Golf Women Mean Business advances women entrepreneurs and career professionals in golf. Founder and CEO Patrina King is dedicated to this membership-based organization that uses golf as a tool for establishing strategic partnerships and career building for women. King says, “Women in business have to learn the game for that’s where all the deals are made.”

King brought together industry professionals, golf professionals and minority business golfers, to discuss diversity and inclusion and growing the game of golf. The discussion was facilitated by Nancy Lewis of Progressive Techniques and some of those represented at the roundtable included: ClubCorp, the American Junior Golf Association, Emory University, Laney Graduate School, Southern Company, the LPGA, Country Financial and the PGA of America.

After idea sharing and candid conversations, the roundtable discussions concluded with an overall acknowledgement of progress in the industry and also that there is a long way to go. The group was pleased at the opportunity to improve relationships with community stakeholders and share the hurdles that lie ahead. There was resounding agreement that more needed to be done to educate, engage and inspire youth to explore the multitude of opportunities in the business of golf for it is more than just a sport. We know that golf is a game that most are ‘invited’ to play for their first time. To leverage the power of the invitation, and to support the agenda of inclusion and diversity, attendees were tasked with asking at least one, non-golfer from a diverse background, to join them at the golf course during their next round.